How does our garden grow…?

One of the joys of moving into a house with an established garden in early spring is watching the flowers coming up. Not knowing what was planted where, we don’t know what’s going to appear in which flowerbed next. This garden is turning out to be a lovely mix of colours and styles.

It has to be said, though, that what seems to be doing particularly well in the garden this year are deflated, punctured footballs, ripped-up tennis balls and faded old, chewed-up orange buoys. The Shetland weather is obviously good for these, though they do make mowing the lawn hazardous. At least, that’s our excuse…

While the rest of the country has been basking in a heatwave, up here we’ve been sitting under a blanket of fog that doesn’t seem to have lifted off the roof of Reawick church just over the bay in a week. However, yesterday (or was it the day before…?) there were a few moments in the late afternoon when some brightness pierced the gloom, and I managed to get some photos of the flowers that are springing up in our garden, around the debris and detritus of Bertie’s playtime…

This six-petalled iris flower is a bit unusual - there are three like it  in the garden

This six-petalled iris flower is a bit unusual – there are three like it in the garden

A purple iris

A purple iris

Pink geraniums

Pink geraniums

A lovely dog rose

A lovely dog rose

These nasturtium buds look like baby spaceships leaving the mothership on umbilical cords

These nasturtium buds look like baby spaceships leaving the mothership on umbilical cords

I love the faded elegance of the old-fashioned aquilegias

I love the faded elegance of the old-fashioned aquilegias

We even have a white one

We even have a white one

The way the central petals fade at the edges is lovely

The way the central petals fade at the edges is lovely

Weilega - a bit old-fashioned but lovely nonetheless

Weilega – a bit old-fashioned but lovely nonetheless

A close look at an iris

A close look at an iris

We've quite a few of them!

We’ve quite a few of them!

A lovely peach and yellow lupin - the Shetland bees love them

A lovely peach and yellow lupin – the Shetland bees love them

No doubt there’ll be all sorts of new plants appearing over the next few weeks – in fact, I think I’ve seen some vetch out at the back already. Watch this space for another flower post…

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